City Planners Around the World

are taking a hard look at their city.

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 Are We Growing Enough?

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Are We Developing Enough? 

Are We Smart Enough? 

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Maybe We Should Be Asking a Different Set of Questions:

WELCOME.

Here we believe in a different set of urban design principles.

Principles that run counter to current urban design culture.

Principles that place humans at the center of the design ethos.

 

Welcome to MYND Place.

 
 

A quick pass through any major or mid-major city across America will show you some familiar sights: Cranes, Cones, and Congestion. New Class A buildings are going up in Class C areas by the thousands completely ignoring the social issues that surround each construction site. While we step over homeless sleeping on the sidewalks, there is a commercial development machine charging ahead letting nothing stand in its way.

Class A Multifamily with ground floor retail, Class A Office with 2.5 parking stalls per 1,000 SF, a multi-billion dollar proposal to widen a major metropolitan freeway…

Enough.

The fact that most city planners don’t want to see and most developers completely ignore is eventually nobody will be able to afford the escalating rents that their buildings require to profit and the widening of any roadway has already been shown to produce more traffic, not less.

What if there was one idea that could recalibrate this massive, inefficient machine?

Take us from a society that is beholden to capital to a society beholden to its people.

A society where the citizen becomes

stakeholder

decision-maker

and owner.

A concept that at its core would not only produce beautiful buildings and efficient roadways that city planners could take pride in, but would decrease, nay, eliminate the social issues that city-dwellers are just hoping will go away if ignored long enough?

We call it, Human Urbanism.

FIND OUT MORE ABOUT OUR APPROACH HERE.

 
 

“We expect too much of new buildings, and too little of ourselves.”

- Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities